"Caldwell Pink"

(Pronounced: CALD-well PINK)

ALSO KNOWN AS:

"Caldwell Pink"

 

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"Caldwell Pink's" blooms are a beautiful lilac-pink with a very small green/yellow eye.

 

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"Caldwell Pink's" blooms occur in dense clusters, usually above the plant, that are highly visible even from a distance.

 

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"Caldwell Pink's" blooms are small but contain hundreds of tiny, delicate, lilac-pink, pointed petals.

 
 

 
GENERAL
INFORMATION:

"Caldwell Pink" is a found everblooming rose that forms a medium-sized bush with dense clusters of small, very double, lilac-pink blossoms with pointed petals. The effect of the flowers is a mass of "fuzzy" light-pink and lilac-pink color.

The growth habit is low, compact and very dense. It has a nice display of fall color before shedding its leaves.

 
BOTANICAL
GROUP:

Chinensis

 
GROUP:

Found

 
CLASS:

Ch

 
SEED
PARENT:

Unknown  

POLLEN
PARENT:

Unknown  

BREEDER:

Unknown  

INTRODUCED:

"Caldwell Pink" is a found rose that was introduced in 1988.  

DATE:

Unknown [ United States ]  

PLANT SIZE
AND FORM:

Height:    3 '     to    5 '           Width:    2 '     to    3 '



"Caldwell Pink' forms a compact bush 3' to 4' in height.  

FOLIAGE
DESCRIPTION:

The foliage is matt green. In the middle of the fall, the foliage turns bright brownish red before dropping.

 
FOLIAGE
FRAGRANCE:

None.  

BLOOM
FREQUENCY:

C - Continuous. "Caldwell Pink' starts blooming in mid-spring (April in San Antonio) and repeats throughout the growing season.

 
BLOOM
DESCRIPTION:
Flower Size:    1.50"      to      2.50"           Cluster Size:    5      to      15           Petal Count:    50 to 70          

"Caldwell Pink" flowers are small (1-1/2" to 2-1/2") and very double with hundreds of tiny pointed petals. The central "eye" is very small and light green/yellow.

 
BLOOM
COLOR:

PB - Pink Blend. "Caldwell Pink" buds are bright pink and open to lilac pink flowers that fade somewhat as they age. The result is that "Caldwell Pink" clusters appear to have a variety of shades of pink.

 
COLOR VARIATION:

The color fades to mauve, giving the impresion of multiple flower colors on the same plant.  

FRAGRANCE:

NF - Not Fragrant. "Caldwell Pink has little or no fragrance.

 
HIPS:

None observed.

 
CLIMATE:

Zones 6 - 9  

CULTURE:

"Caldwell Pink" is not at all fussy about the type of soil, but it prefers a sunny open location. It is very disease resistant, and almost maintenance free.

 
PROPAGATION:

"Caldwell Pink" may be propagated from cuttings.

 
OTHER
CHARACTERISTICS:


    ** Tolerant of shade
    ** Tolerant of poorer soils
    ** Good display of autumn foliage
    ** Good for bedding or mass plantings
    ** Suitable for hedging and fence rows
    ** Suitable for growing in pots
    ** Commercial Availability is limited

Some rosarians have suggested that "Caldwell Pink" is actually an old China rose called 'Pink Pet'.

 
ANECDOTAL
INFORMATION:

Because of its propensity to give a bright display of fall foliage color, "Caldwell Pink" gave me quite a fright the first year. I thought I had killed it for sure because the foliage changed color abruptly and then fell off.

I planted my first specimen (with beautiful dense dark green foliage) in late November, and when I went to look at it a week later, all of the foliage was a deep rusty red. I was greatly alarmed and thought it was a very sick plant.

The next week, "Caldwell Pink" had simply turned into a "stick" with no visible signs of life. This happened well before the other roses in my garden and I was convinced that I would be looking for a replacement plant in the spring.

But to my delight, "Caldwell Pink" leafed out on schedule ithe following April, and promptly began to bloom. Clearly this was not my black thumb in action but normal behavior. You see, this little found rose thinks that it is a Maple tree in disguise.

It gives wonderful fall color (just like a Maple tree), and then turns into a "stick" until spring (just like a Maple tree), and then suddenly wakes up in April and turns back into a beautiful little rose.

I no longer panic when "Caldwell Pink" waxes dramatic in the fall, but just consider this unusual behavior to be another interesting advantage of this wonderful little found rose.

 
REFERENCES:

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1998 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1998, p. 4.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1988 Reference Guide. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1988, p. 57.

Druitt, Liz. The Organic Rose Garden. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company. 1996, pp. 94, 118-119.

Welch, William C.. Antique Roses for the South. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1990, pp. 81, 172.

Last updated 10/10/01 4:33:02 AM