'Cécile Brünner'

(Pronounced: Ce-CILLE BURNE-ner)

ALSO KNOWN AS:

'Cécile Brünner' , 'Maltese Rose' , 'Mignon' , 'Mlle. Cécile Brünner' , 'Mme. Cécile Brünner' , 'Sweetheart Rose'

 

'Cécile Brünner'

[Enlarged Image]

'Cécile Brünner' is a moderate-sized upright bush with distinctive pink flowers.

 

'Cécile Brünner'

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The buds resemble tiny perfectly formed high-centered tea rose buds, and open to small (3/4" - 1-1/2") pink pom-poms that fade to near white.

 

'Cécile Brünner'

[Enlarged Image]

This is a picture of a one-year old specimen of 'Cécile Brünner'.

 
 

 
GENERAL
INFORMATION:

'Cécile Brünner is an exquisite little rose with perfectly formed thimble-sized buds that look like tiny high-centered hybrid tea buds. These perfect little buds have given rise to the name "The Sweetheart Rose".

The blooms are pale pink with deeper pink toward the center. The buds open to cupped very double blooms that reflex to pom-poms. The fragrant blooms repeat throughout the growing season. This rose will tolerate poorer soils and partial shade.

'Cécile Brünner' is a treasure that should be included in every garden.

 
BOTANICAL
GROUP:

Chinensis

 
GROUP:

OGR

 
CLASS:

Pol

 
SEED
PARENT:

A Polyantha Rose  

POLLEN
PARENT:

'Mme. De Tartas'  

BREEDER:

Pernet-Ducher  

INTRODUCED:

'Cécile Brünner' was introduced by Joseph Pernet-Ducher (France) in 1881, having been bred by his mother-in-law.  

DATE:

1881 [ France ]  

PLANT SIZE
AND FORM:

Height:    4 '     to    5 '           Width:    3 '     to    4 '



'Cécile Brünner' is a compact twiggy bush that reaches a height of 3' - 4' and a width of 2'. The wood is brownish purple with few thorns, and it is sometimes spindly.  

FOLIAGE
DESCRIPTION:

The foliage is mid-green, but not particularly shiny. The leaves are smooth, lancelot in shape and approximately 1" long.

 
FOLIAGE
FRAGRANCE:

None.  

BLOOM
FREQUENCY:

R - Repeat. Unlike its climbing sport, Cécile Brünner repeats, with profuse successions of blooms throughout the season. The first blooms appear in early spring (early March in the Texas Hill Country), and continue on and off until frost.

The spring and fall displays can be spectacular.

 
BLOOM
DESCRIPTION:
Flower Size:    .00"      to      .00"           Cluster Size:    5      to      9           Petal Count:    50 to 60          

The form of the 'Cécile Brünner' buds earned it the name of the "Sweetheart Rose". They are perfectly formed like tiny high-centered tea rose buds, and open to very double flowers that reflex to form pom-poms with hundreds of petals.

Depending on the growing conditions, the blooms can be rather small (3/4" - 1") or somewhat larger (approximately 1-1/2") when fully opened. The blooms of Cécile Brünner are somewhat smaller and lighter in color than the climbing sport.

 
BLOOM
COLOR:

lp - Light Pink. 'Cécile Brünner' blooms are light pink in color. The buds are darker than the blooms and somewhat salmon pink in color. As the flowers age, they grow successively paler, and may appear nearly white with only a hint of pink.

 
COLOR VARIATION:

In the spring, the flowers appear singly on wiry stems, but later in the summer and fall they often appear as large open sprays on base shoots above the foliage.  

FRAGRANCE:

mf - Moderately Fragrant. Cécile Brünner has a very pleasing moderate fragrance.

 
HIPS:

None observed.

 
CLIMATE:

Zones 5 - 9  

CULTURE:

Cécile Brünner tolerates various forms of horticultural abuse ranging from poor soils to partial shade. It is less vigorous than the climbing form of Cécile Brünner but has no particular disease problems.

 
PROPAGATION:

Cécile Brünner is very easy to grow and is readily propagated from cuttings.

 
OTHER
CHARACTERISTICS:


    ** Tolerant of shade
    ** Suitable for growing in pots
    ** Suitable for growing in greenhouses
    ** Widely Available in commerce  

ANECDOTAL
INFORMATION:

This rose is often referred to by the masculine name Cecil, but research has indicated that it was actually named for a lady. Therefore, the proper name is Cécile Brünner.

 
REFERENCES:

American Rose Society. Modern Roses 10. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 1993, p. 81.

American Rose Society. Modern Roses XI. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 2000, p. 382.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1998 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1998, pp. 52, 67, 355.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1998 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1998, p. 54.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1988 Reference Guide. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1988, p. 31.

Brickell, Christopher and Zuk, Judith, eds.. The American Horticultural Society A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants. New York: DK Publishing, Inc.. 1997, p. 892.

Druitt, Liz. The Organic Rose Garden. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company. 1996, pp. 97, 119-120.

Scanniello, Stephen and Bayard, Tania. Roses Of America. New York: Henry Holt & Co.. 1990, pp. 115, 134.

Thomas, Graham Stuart. The Graham Stuart Thomas Rose Book. Sagaponack, NY: Sagapress, Inc.. 1994, p. 150.

Welch, William C.. Antique Roses for the South. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1990, pp. 33, 36, 40, 47, 56, 64, 81, 121, 169.

Welch, William C.. Perennial Garden Color. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1989, pp. 223, 238-239.

Welch, William C. and Grant, Greg.. The Southern Heirloom Garden. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1995, p. 164.

Last updated 10/6/01 5:45:09 AM