'Baronne Prévost'

(Pronounced: BARON PRE-vos)

ALSO KNOWN AS:

'Baronne Prévost'

 

'Baronne Prévost'

[Enlarged Image]

'Baronne Prévost' resembles 'Marchesa Boccella' in its upright form and its blooms, though somewhat smaller, resemble those of 'Paul Neyron'.

 

'Baronne Prévost'

[Enlarged Image]

'Baronne Prévost' blooms are a rich soft rose-pink. The shading is lighter toward the outer edges of the blooms.

 

'Baronne Prévost'

[Enlarged Image]

The flowers are large, flat, very double, and quartered at the center with a small button eye.

 
 

 
GENERAL
INFORMATION:

'Baronne Prévost' is a hybrid perpetual shrub that produces large, flat, very double and quartered, very fragrant flowers that repeat frequently throughout the growing season. The growth habit is erect and vigorous.

The flowers resemble those of Paul Neyron, but are smaller, and repeat more frequently.

 
BOTANICAL
GROUP:

Chinensis

 
GROUP:

OGR

 
CLASS:

HP

 
SEED
PARENT:

Unknown  

POLLEN
PARENT:

Unknown  

BREEDER:

Desprez  

INTRODUCED:

'Baronne Prévost' was introduced by M. Desprez (France) in 1842.  

DATE:

1842 [ France ]  

PLANT SIZE
AND FORM:

Height:    4 '     to    5 '           Width:    3 '     to    3 '



'Baronne Prévost' forms a sturdy, chunky, erect shrub that can reach heights of 4' to 5' and widths of 3'.  

FOLIAGE
DESCRIPTION:

The foliage is matt green and slightly coarse. The canes are rather thorny.

 
FOLIAGE
FRAGRANCE:

None.  

BLOOM
FREQUENCY:

R - Repeat. 'Baronne Prévost' starts blooming in mid-spring (May in the Texas Hill Country) and repeats frequently throughout the growing season.

 
BLOOM
DESCRIPTION:
Flower Size:    3.00"      to      3.00"           Cluster Size:    3      to      5           Petal Count:    50 to 60          

'Baronne Prévost' flowers are large (3-1/2" - 4") flat, very double, and quartered at the center with a small button eye.

 
BLOOM
COLOR:

mp - Medium pink. 'Baronne Prévost' blooms are a rich soft rose-pink. The shading is lighter toward the outer edges of the blooms.

 
COLOR VARIATION:

None.  

FRAGRANCE:

VF - Very Fragrant. 'Baronne Prévost' has a powerful fragrance.

 
HIPS:

None observed.

 
CLIMATE:

Zones 5 - 9  

CULTURE:

'Baronne Prévost' tolerates both cold and hot temperatures well. It will tolerate neglect and poor soils, but it prefers good rich soil. It should be pruned with moderation.

'Baronne Prévost resembles 'Marchesa Boccella' in its upright form and its blooms somewhat resemble those of 'Paul 'Baronne Prévost' is somewhat susceptible to blackspot and the flowers do not open properly in wet weather.

 
PROPAGATION:

'Baronne Prévost' may be propagated by cuttings.

 
OTHER
CHARACTERISTICS:


    ** Tolerant of poorer soils
    ** Susceptible to black spot
    ** Flowers ball or are damaged in wet weather
    ** Availability is limited

'Baronne Prévost' resembles 'Marchesa Boccella' in its upright form and its blooms somewhat resemble those of 'Paul Neyron' but are smaller.

 
ANECDOTAL
INFORMATION:

'Baronne Prévost. flowers last well when cut and used in arrangements.

'Baronne Prévost' is great survivor. Plants in excess of 100 years old have been found in South Africa where it was very popular as a hedging rose.

 
REFERENCES:

American Rose Society. Modern Roses 10. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 1993, p. 41.

American Rose Society. Modern Roses XI. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 2000, p. 40.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1988 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1988, p. 39.

Barnard, Loretta, ed.. 500 Popular Roses for American Gardens. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's Educational Series, Inc.. 1997, p. 50.

Beales, Peter. Classic Roses. New York: Henry Holt & Company. 1997, pp. 21-22, 56, 395-396.

Druitt, Liz. The Organic Rose Garden. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company. 1996, pp. 97, 112.

Welch, William C.. Antique Roses for the South. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1990, pp. 120, 164.

Welch, William C. and Grant, Greg.. The Southern Heirloom Garden. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1995, p. 164.