'Mme. Lombard'

(Pronounced: MA-dam LOM-bard)

ALSO KNOWN AS:

'Mme. Lambard' , 'Mme. Lambart' , 'Mme. Lombard'

 

'Mme. Lombard'

[Enlarged Image]

'Mme. Lombard' is a healthy and vigorous Tea rose that is often called the cemetery rose because it is found in great numbers in cemeterie. This demonstrates its amazing ability to survive and thrive in desperate situations.

 

'Mme. Lombard'

[Enlarged Image]

The long crimson buds open to large (3-1/2" to 4-1/2"), very double (50+ petals), moderately fragrant, orange pink blooms that occur almost continuously throughout the growing season.

 

'Mme. Lombard'

[Enlarged Image]

'Mme. Lombard' is one of the best and most reliable roses in our garden. It is a huge bush that is continuously covered with beautiful blooms.

The canes are covered with exceptionally large and sharp prickles. This combination provides an irresistable nesting site for many song birds.

 
 

 
GENERAL
INFORMATION:

'Mme. Lombard' is a healthy and vigorous Tea rose that is often called the cemetery rose because it is found in great numbers in cemeteries. This demonstrates its amazing ability to survive and thrive in desperate situations.

The long crimson buds open to large (3-1/2" to 4-1/2"), very double (50+ petals), moderately fragrant, orange pink blooms that occur almost continuously throughout the growing season.

 
BOTANICAL
GROUP:

Chinensis

 
GROUP:

OGR

 
CLASS:

T

 
SEED
PARENT:

'Mme. De Tartas' seedling  

POLLEN
PARENT:

 

BREEDER:

Lacharme  

INTRODUCED:

'Mme. Lombard' was introduced by Lacharme (France) in 1878.  

DATE:

1878 [ France ]  

PLANT SIZE
AND FORM:

Height:    4 '     to    6 '           Width:    5 '     to    5 '



'Mme. Lombard' forms a large, vigorous shrub that can attain heights of 6 feet and widths of 5 feet.  

FOLIAGE
DESCRIPTION:

The foliage is dark green, large (2-1/2"), serrated, and matte.

 
FOLIAGE
FRAGRANCE:

None.  

BLOOM
FREQUENCY:

c - Continuous. 'Mme. Lombard' starts blooming in April in the Texas Hill Country, and the flowers occur almost continuously throughout the growing season.

 
BLOOM
DESCRIPTION:
Flower Size:    4.00"      to      4.00"           Petal Count:    0 to 0          

The long crimson buds open to large (3-1/2" to 4-1/2"), very double (50+ petals) blooms.

 
BLOOM
COLOR:

op - Orange Pink. The long crimson buds open to orange pink blooms that do not fade appreciably.

 
COLOR VARIATION:

None.  

FRAGRANCE:

mf - Moderately Fragrant. 'Mme. Lombard' has a good Tea-rose fragrance.

 
HIPS:

None observed.

 
CLIMATE:

Zones 6 - 11  

CULTURE:

'Mme. Lombard' is a very healthy and long-lived rose that is frequently found growing, unattended, in cemeteries. It has no major disease problems and is tolerant of poorer soils.

 
PROPAGATION:

'Mme. Lombard' is easily propagated from cuttings.

 
OTHER
CHARACTERISTICS:


    ** Tolerant of poorer soils
    ** Suitable for hedging and fence rows
    ** Suitable for growing in pots
    ** Commercial Availability is limited

Except in its color, 'Mme. Lombard' is similar in every respect to its sport parent, 'Mme. De Tartas'.

 
ANECDOTAL
INFORMATION:

'Mme. Lombard' is one of the best and most reliable roses in our garden. It is a huge bush that is continuously covered with beautiful blooms. But there is another benefit that I did not initially anticipate.

The foliage of 'Mme. Lombard' is quite dense and the inner canes are shaded and have few leaves. The canes are also covered with exceptionally large and sharp prickles. This combination is irresistible to certain song birds.

Soon after planting our rose garden, my wife noticed a marked increase in the population of Cardinals, her favorite song bird, and 'Mme. Lombard' is one of their favorite nesting sites. This is because there is plenty of room within the bush for a nest.

Also, any predator, such as a stray cat or a raccoon, that would venture into 'Mme. Lombard' would soon be a candidate for a trip to the local hospital's emergency room.

Suffice it to say, 'Mme. Lombard' seems to always have a Cardinal's nest nestled within its canes, protected by an impenetrable wall of thorns.

 
REFERENCES:

American Rose Society. Modern Roses 10. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 1993, p. 341.

American Rose Society. Modern Roses XI. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 2000, p. 390.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1998 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1998, p. 36.

Botanica. Botanica's Roses - The Encyclopedia of Roses. North Rochester, Kent, England: Grange Books. 1998, p. 384.

Welch, William C.. Antique Roses for the South. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1990, p. 153.

Last updated 10/7/01 7:36:56 AM