'Sombreuil'

(Pronounced: sohm BRURH ee)

ALSO KNOWN AS:

'Colonial White' , 'Sombreuil'

'Sombreuil'

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One of the finest of the white tea roses, 'Sombreuil' opens from creamy white buds to a full, very double bloom with hundreds of petals.

 

'Sombreuil'

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As the bloom continues to open, it assumes a nearly flat configuration. The bright whiteness of the blooms seem odd since the name, 'Sombreuil', means "darkness" in French.

However this rose was not named for its color, but in memory of Mlle de Sombreuil, a heroine of the French Revolution.

 

'Sombreuil'

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The blooms of 'Sombreuil' are relatively tight when they first open and appear to be semi-double to double.

 

'Sombreuil'

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But when as they open further they flatten and more and more petals appear.

 

'Sombreuil'

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'Sombreuil' is a well manered climber thet blooms continuously throughout the growing season.

 

'Sombreuil'

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The blooms are pure white and "glow in the dark" in the moonlight of a summer evening.

 

 
GENERAL
INFORMATION:

'Sombreuil' is a one of the earliest and hardiest of the white tea roses, with creamy white blossoms that open flat and quartered to display hundreds of small petals.

The blooms are fairly large (3" - 3-1/2") and have a distinctive tea scent. The plant may be grown as a moderate "well-mannered" climber for a low fence or wall, or, alternatively, as an 8' - 12' pillar rose.

 
BOTANICAL
GROUP:

Chinensis

 
GROUP:

OGR

 
CLASS:

Cl T

 
SEED
PARENT:

Gigantesque seedling  

POLLEN
PARENT:

 

BREEDER:

Robert  

INTRODUCED:

'Sombreuil' was introduced by M. Robert (France) in 1850.  

DATE:

1835 [ France ]  

PLANT SIZE
AND FORM:

Height:    8 '     to    12 '           Width:    3 '     to    4 '



'Sombreuil' has long slender canes that grow to a length of 8' - 12'. With its abundant prickles, will happily climb on a fence or trellis and is readily trained on a pillar.  

FOLIAGE
DESCRIPTION:

The foliage is dark green and semi-glossy. The stems are quite thorny, so wear good gloves when pruning or training this rose.

The foliage sheds in the winter and occasionally in the summer heat.

 
FOLIAGE
FRAGRANCE:

None.  

BLOOM
FREQUENCY:
 
BLOOM
DESCRIPTION:
Flower Size:    4.00"      to      4.00"           Cluster Size:    2      to      3           Petal Count:    100 to 150          

'Sombreuil' flowers are moderately large (3" - 3-1/2"), very double, quartered, distinctively flat, and saucer-like. They contain hundreds of small petals

 
BLOOM
COLOR:

w - White. 'Sombreuil' blooms are creamy white with occasional blushes of pink.

 
COLOR VARIATION:

None.  

FRAGRANCE:

VF - Very fragrant. 'Sombreuil' has a strong, distinctive tea fragrance.

 
HIPS:

None observed.

 
CLIMATE:

Zones 7 - 9  

CULTURE:

'Sombreuil' is very hardy and disease resistant, and does not require spraying. Dead wood and unwanted canes should be pruned out.

 
PROPAGATION:

'Sombreuil' is more difficult to root than many china or tea roses, but persistence pays off.

 
OTHER
CHARACTERISTICS:


    ** Requires sunny location to thrive
    ** Makes good cut flowers
    ** Availability is limited

Left to its own devices, 'Sombreuil' will form a large dense mounding shrub, as wide as it is high. Unlike most climbers, 'Sombreuil' does not appear to be a sport of another bush, but is an independent climbing form that developed by itself.

'Sombreuil' buds form in clusters, but the stems are long enough to make it a reasonable cut flower.

 
ANECDOTAL
INFORMATION:

My personal experience with 'Sombreuil' has been very rewarding. I obtained a specimen and planted it, in the middle of the summer, at the corner of a small cabin that was painted barn-red with white trim.

'Sombreuil' was very cooperative and immediately began to climb up some wires that I had installed between the ground and the eaves of the cabin.

The dark green foliage was very pleasing but I was really unprepared for the first flush of blooms that came in the fall.

The flowers were breathtakingly beautiful. I kept going back again and again to look at them and smell the fragrance.

When spring came, I found myself going to 'Sombreuil' first when I checked the roses because I could hardly wait for the beautiful white flowers to appear.

 
REFERENCES:

American Rose Society. Modern Roses 10. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 1993, p. 561.

American Rose Society. Modern Roses XI. Shreveport, Louisiana: American Rose Society. 2000, p. 36.

Antique Rose Emporium. The Antique Rose Emporium 1988 Catalog. Independence, Texas: Antique Rose Emporium. 1988, p. 36.

Beales, Peter. Classic Roses. New York: Henry Holt & Company. 1997, pp. 78, 82, 389.

Druitt, Liz. The Organic Rose Garden. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Company. 1996, pp. 104, 174-175.

Taylor. (Maggie Oster, Consulting Ed.r). Taylor's Pocket Guide to Old-fashioned Roses. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co.. 1989, p. 103.

Welch, William C.. Antique Roses for the South. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1990, pp. 56, 71, 120-121, 151.

Welch, William C.. Perennial Garden Color. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1989, pp. 211, 238-239.

Welch, William C. and Grant, Greg.. The Southern Heirloom Garden. Dallas: Taylor Publishing. 1995, pp. 160-161.